Broome “Laying the Foundation” For Mayor’s Race

With Baton Rouge Mayor Kip Holden term limited-and presumably still interested in running for lieutenant governor in 2015-Senate President Pro Tem Sharon Weston Broome is emerging as a strong contender to run for the helm of the city-parish.

Folks in Red Stick still remember Broome from her reporting on WBRZ-TV and her sometimes conservative voting record could be just the thing to create strong inroads into south Baton Rouge and the more rural factions of the electorate. Last month, she was among the few Democrats to be recognized by the Louisiana Family Forum for her support of its agenda. Her Senate district already covers south Baton Rouge, where she is a popular elected official. What remains to be seen is whether she can ramp up her fundraising efforts and hold her own in some serious debates.

“I have been receiving support and have been encouraged to pursue the mayor’s race in 2016,” Broome told LaPolitics. “It’s something I am very serious about. But it’s a ways down the road and I still have some time left in the Senate and we have some very serious issues that need to be addressed.”

Broome, however, isn’t alone. Republican William Daniel, Holden’s chief administrative officer and a former state representative, is said to be watching the field closely in hopes of repeating his 2004 campaign for mayor. District Attorney Hillar Moore could shake things up, but has ruled out running. The rest of the likely pack can be found on the Metro Council.

Councilman John Delgado, who was crowned the king of Artemis this past weekend, is said to be laying his own foundation as well-and serving up drinks at his new downtown bar Huey’s. Two other Council members, Joel Boé, a Republican, and Tara Wicker, a Democrat, have also let it be known they’re interested.

Of the 278,183 registered voters in East Baton Rouge Parish, 146,524 are white and 119,179 are black. Democrats still outnumber Republicans in the city, 137,806 to 77,187, with 95,991 registered black Democrats and 63,190 voters registered as “other,” according to the Secretary of State’s Oct. 1 report.

This story was first published for our subscribers on Oct. 10 in Issue 954 of LaPolitics Weekly. Wish you would have seen it last week? Just click HERE

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